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July 21, 2017

Note: Justice Talking's grant funding expired in 2008 and the project has been closed. This website is an archive of the entire run of Justice Talking shows through June 30, 2008.
It is no longer being maintained. We apologize for any stale or broken links.
Featured Program

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Fixing the Mortgage Mess
Last Featured: 11/12/2007

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Note: Justice Talking ceased production on June 30 of 2008. Link information on this site is not maintained and is provided for historical interest only. Although correct when posted, The Annenberg Public Policy Center makes no claim as the the accuracy or continued availability of any third party web links found on this site.
Overview

Many Americans’ dream of homeownership has been lost as the subprime mortgage crisis has forced them to face foreclosure. Others ready to buy or refinance a home are finding fewer financing options as lenders are shutting their doors or laying off thousands of employees. Tune in to this edition of Justice Talking as we look at the current mortgage mess and ask how business and government should respond.


The Sub-Prime Meltdown
Host Margot Adler speaks with financial reporter Scott Reckard about the factors that led to the current mortgage industry crisis.


Scott Reckard has been a Los Angeles-based financial reporter since 1989 at the Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times. He has written extensively for the Los Angeles Times about the mortgage industry's problems.

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The Housing Rescue Scam
Reporter Karen Brown reveals a little-known follow-on to the housing foreclosure crisis: the rescue scam.

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Debate on the Issue: Governmental Bailout?
Host Margot Adler is joined by financial journalist Robert Kuttner and finance professor Joseph Mason to discuss the government's response to the mortgage crisis and future regulation for lenders.


Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect. He writes regularly for the magazine on political and economic issues. He has just completed the book The Squandering of America: How the Failure of Our Politics Undermines Our Prosperity and serves as a fellow at the think tank Demos.


Joseph Mason is an associate professor of finance and research fellow at Drexel University’s LeBow College of Business, a fellow at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and a visiting scholar at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Prior to joining Drexel University, Dr. Mason was a financial economist with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and adjunct assistant professor of finance at Georgetown University School of Business.

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The Impact of Foreclosures
Host Margot Adler speaks with Ohio public official Jim Rokakis about the changes he has seen in his community in the wake of the mortgage crisis.


Jim Rokakis is the treasurer for Cuyahoga County in Ohio. He took office as county treasurer in 1997 after serving for over 19 years on Cleveland City Council. Faced with Cuyahoga County’s mortgage foreclosure crisis, Rokakis helped to write and pass House Bill 294, which streamlines the foreclosure process for abandoned properties, and he took a leadership role in combating predatory lending and assisting homeowners facing foreclosure. A recent op-ed by Jim Rokakis is available here.

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Credit Woes
Reporter Curt Nickisch profiles the struggle of one Boston family to get a housing loan in today’s market, a struggle that’s become more complex even for people with good credit and the cash for a down payment.

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Advice from a Real Estate Expert
Host Margot Adler speaks with author Elizabeth Razzi about real estate investments and mortgage security in an unsteady market.


Elizabeth Razzi is a real estate columnist for The Washington Post and author of two consumer advice books, The Fearless Home Buyer and The Fearless Home Seller. Her articles have appeared in Reader’s Digest, Real Simple magazine, The Chicago Tribune, and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

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Special Announcements
Justice Talking’s last broadcast & podcast was June 30, 2008.
Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 (pending)
Credit Rating Reform Act of 2006
Homeowners and Bank Protection Act of 2007
House Financial Services Committee Hearing on Preventing Mortgage Foreclosures (includes video)
Securities and Exchange Commission
Federal Housing Administration
Neighborhood Assistance Corp. of America
Center for Responsible Lending
National Association of Mortgage Brokers
America: What Went Wrong?
by Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele
Mortgage Confidential: What You Need to Know That Your Lender Won't Tell You
by David Reed
Mortgage Ripoffs and Money Savers: An Industry Insider Explains How to Save Thousands on Your Mortgage or Re-Fi
by Carolyn Warren
The New Mortgage Investment Advisor: Structuring Your Mortgage to Work as a Financial Planning Tool
by Peter D. Mitchell and James D. Pidd
The US Economy
Can We End Homelessness in 10 Years?
Tax Reform