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April 26, 2017

Note: Justice Talking's grant funding expired in 2008 and the project has been closed. This website is an archive of the entire run of Justice Talking shows through June 30, 2008.
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Featured Program

Photo by: Sonia J. Stamm
Prescriptions Across the Border
Last Featured: 11/1/2004

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Note: Justice Talking ceased production on June 30 of 2008. Link information on this site is not maintained and is provided for historical interest only. Although correct when posted, The Annenberg Public Policy Center makes no claim as the the accuracy or continued availability of any third party web links found on this site.
Overview

Are medications from Manitoba less reliable than those from Minnesota? Skyrocketing drug prices have encouraged net-savvy seniors to shop at pharmacies in Canada for prescriptions they can purchase at a fraction of what they would pay locally. Drug companies warn that without FDA oversight the products are, at best, unreliable and, at worst, unsafe. The new Medicare bill also makes clear that the practice is illegal. But with the FDA signaling its ambivalence and the questionable congressional action on prescription drug coverage, seniors are increasingly willing to cross the border to purchase the drugs they need.


Guests
Joseph L. Bast is director, president, and CEO of The Heartland Institute, a national, independent, nonprofit research center. Mr. Bast is the coauthor of five books on school reform, health care reform, economic development, and environmentalism. He is also the publisher of Intellectual Ammunition, a bimonthly magazine, and three monthly newspapers: School Reform News, Environment & Climate News, and Health Care News. Prior to joining The Heartland Institute, Mr. Bast was publisher and coeditor of Nomos: Studies in Spontaneous Order, a bimonthly magazine on contemporary issues.

Chellie Pingree is the President and CEO of Common Cause, a national organization, with 200,000 members that works for open, accountable government and the right of all citizens to be involved in shaping our nation's public policies. She is former State Senator and only the second woman to rise to House Majority Leader in Maine, a position she held until term limits prohibited her from seeking another term. Ms. Pingree became known for her efforts to pass the Prescription Drug Fair Pricing Act to reduce the high cost of prescription drugs.

Closing Quote
"Formerly when religion was strong and science weak, men mistook magic for medicine. Now when science is strong and religion weak, men mistake medicine for magic."

— Psychiatrist Thomas Szasz

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Special Announcements
Justice Talking’s last broadcast & podcast was June 30, 2008.
Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
The Fight For Affordable Prescription Drugs
National Association of Chain Drug Stores
American Medical News
Public Citizen
The Heritage Foundation
AARP
American Medical Association
Protecting America's Health: The FDA, Business, and One Hundred Years of Regulation
by Philip J. Hilts
The Merck Druggernaut: The Inside Story of a Pharmaceutical Giant
by Fran Hawthorne
The Law and Infectious Disease
Is There a Right to Health Care?
Have Health Officials Become the Diet Police?