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September 26, 2017

Note: Justice Talking's grant funding expired in 2008 and the project has been closed. This website is an archive of the entire run of Justice Talking shows through June 30, 2008.
It is no longer being maintained. We apologize for any stale or broken links.
Featured Program

Photo by: Sonia J. Stamm
Free Speech in the Free Market: Is Nike Swearing off Sweatshops?
Last Featured: 5/12/2003

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Overview

NIKE and anti-sweatshop activists have battled for years over company practices and the role of American business overseas. To counter protesters, in 1997, NIKE launched a public relations campaign promoting itself as a responsible corporate citizen. But a San Francisco activist believes that instead of talking about good corporate practice, the company should "just do it." In a case now before the U.S. Supreme Court, the company is accused of “false advertising.” Activists were bolstered by an early ruling, but it is the high court that will soon determine the limits to free enterprise's right to free speech.


Guests
Tom Goldstein is co-counsel in the Nike vs. Kasky case recently argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. A founding partner in the firm Goldstein and Howe, P.C., he is widely recognized as one of the nation's leading Supreme Court litigators. Since founding the firm in 1999, he has argued six cases at the Court spanning the gamut of federal law issues, including the First Amendment, ERISA, federal preemption, and civil procedure. The American Lawyer included him in its profile of the nation's half-dozen leading Supreme Court advocates, the Legal Times has dubbed him "a master of the Court's docket," and the Washington Post identified him as "the Court's unofficial statistician."

David C. Vladeck is an Associate Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center. Prior to joining the Law Center faculty, he was director of Public Citizen’s Litigation Group. He was a public member of the Administrative Conference of the U.S. and a consultant in American Law for the Institute for Liberty and Democracy in Lima, Peru. Professor Vladeck was a graduate teaching fellow at the Law Center's Institute for Public Representation, and he joined the adjunct faculty in 1987. He was a visiting professor at the Law Center from spring 1999 through spring 2000 teaching Civil Procedure and an upperclass seminar in first amendment litigation.

Closing Quote
"Of course advertising creates wants. Of course it makes people discounted, dissatisfied. Satisfaction with things as they are would defeat the American Dream."

— Bernice Fitz-Gibbon

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Special Announcements
Justice Talking’s last broadcast & podcast was June 30, 2008.
Nike
ReclaimDemocracy.org
ACLU of Northern California
Corporate Watch
Chamber of Commerce
Sweatshop Watch
Censorship, Inc.: The Corporate Threat to Free Speech in the United States
by Lawrence Soley
The Swoosh : Unauthorized Story of Nike and the Men Who Played There
by J. B. Strasser
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