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November 18, 2017

Note: Justice Talking's grant funding expired in 2008 and the project has been closed. This website is an archive of the entire run of Justice Talking shows through June 30, 2008.
It is no longer being maintained. We apologize for any stale or broken links.
Featured Program

Photo by: Sonia J. Stamm
Media Monopolies and the Future of Broadcasting
Last Featured: 3/10/2003

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Note: Justice Talking ceased production on June 30 of 2008. Link information on this site is not maintained and is provided for historical interest only. Although correct when posted, The Annenberg Public Policy Center makes no claim as the the accuracy or continued availability of any third party web links found on this site.
Overview

The behemoths of broadcasting are growing larger every day. AT&T Broadband recently merged with Comcast. Three formerly independent companies now operate under AOL Time Warner. The lesser known Clear Channel has already gobbled up more than 10% of the nation’s commercial radio stations, and print media moguls are busy collecting local newspapers and niche magazines. Industry executives claim that it is a matter of economic necessity; media watchdog groups warn that the mergers are not in the public interest. Since the deregulation of the communications industry in 1996, the consolidation of news and information sources along with music and entertainment venues has accelerated at a rapid pace. Is the industry simply adjusting to new technological and financial realities? Or does diminished diversity of media sources dangerously chip away at our democracy’s Fourth Estate?


Guests
Andrew Jay Schwartzman is the president and CEO of the Media Access Project, a public interest telecommunications law firm which represents listeners' and speakers' First Amendment interests in electronic media and telecommunications issues before the Federal Communications Commission, the courts, and other policy-making bodies. Recognized as one of the foremost authorities on telecommunications policy, Mr. Schwartzman has contributed to numerous scholarly journals and legal publications about a range of telecommunications issues. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, The National Law Journal has named Mr. Schwartzman as a "bell ringer," one of the nation's thirty leading communications lawyers.

Adam Thierer is the director of Telecommunications Studies at the Cato Institute where he conducts research on how government regulations are hampering the evolution of communications networks, including telephony, broadcasting, cable, satellite and the Internet. Prior to joining Cato, Thierer spent nine years at The Heritage Foundation, where he served as the Alex C. Walker Fellow in Economic Policy covering telecommunications and Internet policy. Thierer has written extensively on a host of telecommunications issues.

Closing Quote
"Television is the first truly democratic culture - the first culture available to everyone and entirely governed by what the people want. The most terrifying thing is what people do want."

— Arts Critic Clive Barnes

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Justice Talking’s last broadcast & podcast was June 30, 2008.
Cato Institute
Media Access Project
Media Channel Issue Guides
A satiric song from the Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Gospel Choir
Federal Communications Commission
Center for Digital Democracy
Columbia Journalism Review
Telecommunications Industry Association
A satiric song from the Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Gospel Choir
Cato Institute
Media Access Project
Media Channel Issue Guides
Federal Communications Commission
Center for Digital Democracy
Columbia Journalism Review
Telecommunications Industry Association
Conglomerates and the Media
by Erik Barnouw, Eric Barnouw, Todd Gitlin
Megamedia: How Giant Corporations Dominate Mass Media, Distort Competition, and Endanger Democracy
by Dean Alger
The Media Monopoly: With a New Preface on the Internet and Telecommunications Cartels
by Ben H. Bagdikian, Benjamin H. Bagdikian
Regulation of the Entertainment Industry
The FCC's New Rules for Media Ownership
Pornography and the First Amendment